Archive for December 31st, 2016

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2016 Word of the Year

December 31, 2016

‘Surreal’ is our 2016 Word of the Year

Surreal is Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Year because it was looked up significantly more frequently by users in 2016 than it was in previous years, and because there were multiple occasions on which this word was the one clearly driving people to their dictionary.

There are essentially two kinds of high-volume lookups that we track: perennial words that are looked up day-in and day-out, and words that spike because of news events, politics, pop culture, or sports. By analyzing these spikes, we can get a sense as to what significant events sent people to the dictionary, and sometimes, what people think about those events.

Surreal had three major spikes in interest that were higher in volume and were sustained for longer periods of time than in past years. In March, the word was used in coverage of the Brussels terror attacks. Then, in July, we saw the word spike again: it was used in descriptions of the coup attempt in Turkey and in coverage of the terrorist attack in Nice. Finally, we saw the largest spike in lookups for surreal following the U.S. election in November. […]

Ain’t it the truth?


And in a similar vein.

Dave Barry’s Year in Review: 2016 — What the …?

In the future, Americans — assuming there are any left — will look back at 2016 and remark: “What the HELL?”

They will have a point. Over the past few decades, we here at the Year in Review have reviewed some pretty disturbing years. For example, there was 2000, when the outcome of a presidential election was decided by a tiny group of deeply confused Florida residents who had apparently attempted to vote by chewing on their ballots.

Then there was 2003, when a person named “Paris Hilton” suddenly became a major international superstar, despite possessing a level of discernible talent so low as to make the Kardashians look like the Jackson 5.

There was 2006, when the vice president of the United States — who claimed he was attempting to bring down a suspected quail — shot a 78-year-old man in the face, only to be exonerated after an investigation revealed that the victim was an attorney.

And — perhaps most inexplicable of all — there was 2007, when millions of people voluntarily installed Windows Vista.

Yes, we’ve seen some weird years. But we’ve never seen one as weird as 2016. This was the Al Yankovic of years. If years were movies, 2016 would be “Plan 9 from Outer Space.” If years were relatives, 2016 would be the uncle who shows up at your Thanksgiving dinner wearing his underpants on the outside. […]


Sigh…

As @JackieJackielg says, "I solemnly vow to speak of Trump with the same respect and decency he has shown others."

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Recommended reading

December 31, 2016

Daniel Bier, writing at Learn Liberty, has compiled a list of books he recommends.

I’ve removed his summaries for each of the books, so you may want to RTWT. It’s brief.

13 books every well-rounded libertarian should read

There are books that every libertarian should read and books every libertarian has read, but those circles don’t perfectly overlap. Here are 13 diverse book recommendations for well-rounded thinkers.

Economic Sophisms – Frederic Bastiat […]

Basic Economics + Applied Economics – Thomas Sowell […]

Beyond Politics: The Roots of Government Failure – Randy Simmons […]

The Problem of Political Authority – Michael Huemer […]

The Myth of the Rational Voter – Bryan Caplan […]

The Theory of Moral Sentiments – Adam Smith […]

The God of the Machine – Isabel Paterson […]

No Treason: The Constitution of No Authority – Lysander Spooner […]

Radicals for Capitalism – Brian Doherty […]

Democracy in America – Alexis de Tocqueville […]

The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress – Robert Heinlein […]

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich – Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn […]

I’ve read about half of these. I give the list +1 for One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, for The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, and for anything written by Thomas Sowell, who once said, "It takes considerable knowledge just to realize the extent of your own ignorance." I’ll allow that Twain himself couldn’t have put that one any better.

But I give the list -1 for Paterson’s The God of the Machine. What an incredibly odd read that is. I found Paterson’s use of pseudo-technical terms to describe economic relationships both tedious and distracting. So I’d say read one of Russell Roberts’ books instead.

The older books on this list (Bastiat’s, Smith’s, and Spooner’s) are available for little or nothing to Kindle readers.

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